About Phil Gribbon

TL;DR: UX Designer and photographer based in Yangon, Myanmar.

Phil designs things to make sure the internet serves people better. Sometimes that means he writes the words on a screen, sometimes he builds a team to deliver a project, sometimes he devises a strategy to pull everything together. The thing people see at the end is usually a website, app or platform.

He’s worked in startups in London, Egypt and India and freelanced for organisations around the world. He mostly likes taking on big complex multi-faceted projects that need clarity and direction, as well as ensuring end products do the right job for the right people.

Phil’s UX design and direction has helped make social networks, media platforms, banking applications, promotional and educational websites, business software, customer apps, and design language systems. He’s done UX audits for companies across a bunch of industries, providing a roadmap for where they focus next. He does a bit of graphic design and branding to distill things down to their essence, but would often rather source from a network of talented Myanmar designers because they’re awesome.

Working in Myanmar since 2013, he has trained Burmese designers and built teams to deliver world-class products for industry-leading businesses and visionary entrepreneurs. He’s slowly (slowly) building an online training resource for more designers to think critically about product definition, interaction flows and human-focussed design.

His photographs have appeared in The Telegraph (to his horror) and have been used for book and album covers, and once in an internal Skoda magazine. He’s not that pushed tbh. The industry is just too wonky. That doesn’t stop him from doggedly pursuing a long-term personal project documenting Myanmar’s emerging youth cultures.

He grew up in England and claims he’s Irish but has neither the brogue nor the charm. He managed to get a Maths degree in Manchester when he was wee, and then shortly after met a man called Kevin who gave him a laptop and told him to be a designer. Thanks Kevin.

He stopped paying for a portfolio website and now he has to make one himself. Give him a minute.

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